Family Problems

Moving to a new country is often difficult for families. Family members may be confused about American life-styles; they may be homesick for their own country; they may worry about money, making friends, or being successful at KU. The University of Kansas has a Counseling Center for students who want to feel better about their lives at KU. Marriage counseling is also available in Lawrence. If you want to talk with someone about your life here, please come to the Applied English Center office to discuss your situation or find out about other offices that might help. The staff is eager to make your stay at KU pleasant.

In Kansas and most states in the United States, there are laws about abuse and neglect of children. Abuse and neglect are culturally defined ideas, so what is considered abuse or neglect may be different here than in your home country. For example, children, even up to the age of twelve, may not be left alone at home, or in a car, or in a public place. In the United States, children must be supervised by a parent or other responsible older person. Any kind of physical discipline or punishment that leaves a child bruised or injured may be considered abuse. Abuse or neglect may lead to legal action against the parents or even removal of the child from the family. Teachers, school counselors, and medical personnel (doctors, nurses, hospital workers) are required by law to report cases of possible child abuse or neglect to the authorities.


Founded in 1964 as part of a Ford Foundation campus internationalization grant
One of the first 12 intensive English programs in the United States
The AEC comprises two units: the Intensive English Program (IEP) and Short-term Programs
Each semester, the AEC enrolls about 550 students representing more than 35 countries on six continents
The Applied English Center offers field trips and conversation groups to our students
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